MAYOR BOLLWAGE REMINDS COMMUNITY MARCH IS NATIONAL COLON CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kelly Vence

908-820-4124

Public Information Office

 

MAYOR BOLLWAGE REMINDS COMMUNITY MARCH IS NATIONAL COLON CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

ELIZABETH, NJ— March 4, 2014 - Mayor J. Christian Bollwage would like to remind the community that March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and that is why March is dedicated to raising awareness about the benefits of getting checked out.

“Colorectal cancer is the most treatable and preventable cancer we have, but 55,000 Americans a year are still dying from it,” said Mayor J. Christian Bollwage. “Far too many people neglect getting tested because of fear. Today I encourage our community to set aside their doubts and get tested at their local physician.”

Due to the importance of this issue, the City of Elizabeth allows all employees time, which is not deducted from vacation or sick, to have a cancer screening done. Mayor Bollwage encourages all businesses to do the same for their staff.

Organizations across the country celebrate this special month with an array of informative events. While they occur all month long, “National Dress in Blue Day” is held annually on the first Friday of March; this year it falls on March 7th. On this day, the nation unites in the color blue to raise funds to support the Colon Cancer Alliance's lifesaving programs.

While colon cancer is most often found in people over the age of fifty and older, studies show that it is currently on the rise in younger groups. Family history also has a significant impact on one's risk. In fact, people with an immediate relative who has colon cancer are 2-3 times more likely to develop the disease.

For adults over the age of fifty (50) it is extremely important to get checked. Early detection can lead to better odds of getting cured. More than 90% of cases occur in people who are 50 years old or older. These screenings help find precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer, increasing the ability to prevent colorectal cancer. If colorectal cancer is found early during a screening, treatment options may be available and can lead to a cure for the patient.

According to the American Cancer Society, the estimated number of colorectal cancer cases in the United States for 2014 are 96,830 and the overall lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about 1 in 20 (5%). This danger is slightly lower in women than in men.

As a result of early detection, there are now more than one million survivors of colorectal cancer in America.

For more information about Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, National Dress in Blue Day, screenings and preventative lifestyle changes, visit the Colon Cancer Alliance’s website at www.ccalliance.org, or Fight Colorectal Cancer at www.fightcolorectalcancer.org.